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When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

Babies start talking around the six-month mark, but learning language is a more complex skill to acquire. As a result, even though a child may be able to say small words at six months, such as “mama,” or “dada,” or “baba,” she may not start talking clearly or talking in full sentences until she is two years or older. Some children do not speak well until they reach the age of four. Many factors, such as support, education, environment, and even genetics can influence how fast your child begins to talk clearly.

When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

From Babbling to Talking: An Introductory Overview

One of the bigger milestones that parents watch for is when babies start to talk. Parents eagerly await their child being able to talk clearly, use words well, and speak in full sentences. Who hasn’t tried to get their child to say “mama” or “dada” as a first word? Besides walking, talking is the most anticipated milestone among parents, especially new parents.

0-3 Months

Many experts will agree that it is never too early to begin teaching your child about language. Even while your baby is still in the womb, it is good to talk to him or her and let your baby become accustomed to your voice; this is not only a good bonding experience between the parents and the baby, but it is also a great way to get the baby to associate your voice with kindness and interest. This will help their learning ability and interest to grow later on.

Once the baby is born, talking to your baby continues this same idea. There are a couple of different ways to engage your child in working on his speech; it is good to try out the different methods a few times each, to see what your baby responds to and what she likes. The first method is simple; it is just talking to your baby. You can talk regularly, telling your baby what you are doing or what you are thinking. Many people call this way the more organic way of doing things, because it is just like having a one-sided conversation. You can also try stimulating your baby’s interest by using props. Getting your baby used to words by showing items or objects such as toys, or words and pictures on flash cards, means you are helping them to absorb the language and also allows them to observe you as you speak. Many babies will learn to imitate the sounds they hear by mimicking the way the mouth moves. I have a mom who is a speech-language pathologist, and she will often help kids learn new words by forming a child’s mouth, lips, and movement in the shape of the word. You can do similar things, by enunciating, and encouraging your child to do simple movements. At 0-3 months, many “b” sounds are easily encouraged as the bilabial sounds are among the easiest to develop. “M” sounds are also common because the baby commonly starts out with no teeth, making the “m” sound easier, even though the movement of the lips together can stump them for a bit.

During the 0-3 month period, some babies can learn several new words; however, these words will likely not be traditional or formal words. They will be more like syllables or gargles. Sounds like “ba” for bottle, for example, will indicate more of what he or she is saying. As your child grows, he will learn about how to say different sounds and make the connection between different names and objects. There is no need to worry about teaching him or feeling like a failure if he does not learn any specific words during this time. It is unlikely during this time that your baby will say words, but her sounds and her syllables will be able to give you hints as to what she wants or what she needs.

3-6 Months

By the 3-6 mark of your baby’s first year, your baby has begun to move his legs and arms more, and lift his head and enjoy tummy time much more. This is a time where they are seeing more of the world, and they are growing into their routines. It was during this time for my children that a routine became more obvious. Routines can be a good thing, because it can really help new parents find time to structure in learning activities; however, early on in the baby’s life, routines will need to be evaluated more often as the child grows. My son, for example, did not want to have his third nap of the day after he reached the six-month mark. For my daughter, she did not enjoy tummy time unless my husband was home to play with her. Eventually, as she began crawling, she would prefer me to sit with her while she moved around.

When it comes to routines with language, at this age it can be more easy to sit the baby down in a high chair and work on his language using toys and food, or showing him objects while he is sitting. This is where some friends of mine would use flash cards, to help the baby learn new words. Others I know would play short movies, usually with songs with motions, like “If You’re Happy and You Know It,” or “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.”

As your baby gets closer to the six-month mark, it is likely that he will begin trying to sound out words. Even if he or she cannot be clear about it, it is good to encourage your child in his or her efforts. During this time, it is possible for “mama” and “dada” to come up.

When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

6-12 Months

Between six and twelve months is when babies will start saying more words. This is the time when most experts agree that your baby will begin using words such as “mama” and “dada” and other easy words as well, usually no more than two syllables in length. During this time, infants will learn between five and ten new words, likely phrases or words they hear at home. My kids learned “kitty” very quickly, because we had two cats running around the house. Many parents will see the same things happening around their kids and their lives.

12-24 Months

A growing pattern of progress should continue during this time. Around the eighteenth month mark, your child will begin to form sentences with two or more words. Their vocabulary and knowledge of different words will continue to grow, though it may take some time to see significant progress, depending on the level of exposure. Many parents with more than one child will find that the subsequent children are able to pick up language use more quickly. This largely results from more exposure. I know my children play together, and because of this, there is a large amount of time that they spent interacting with the same toys and places. This is another reason why several parents who put their kids in daycare will often see progress differently from parents who keep their babies at home, particularly if their child is their only child. This difference among the way parents raise kids and the environments in which they live and work is also another reason why some kids respond differently to learning language.

As your baby grows into a toddler, their command of language will reflect that. They will likely be able to identify more objects and they will begin to repeat phrases. This is where the parents become more alert when it comes to their children hearing particular phrases or family secrets, fearful that it might be repeated or brought up in the wrong context. While this prompts more caution and discreteness from parents.

Things to Watch

Since every child grows and learns at his or her own pace, and learning something as complex as language requires time, practice, and incentive, it can be difficult to determine if there is an exact time to worry. If you suspect your child has a speech problem, whether it is learning new words, or remembering old words, you may want to consult with the child’s pediatrician. Having some documentation can also help, especially in the event that your baby’s doctor will ask for specific examples or concerns. This is part of the reason many speech and communication disorders are able to be formally diagnosed between two and three years of age now.

Genetics can also offer a clue when it comes time to worry. Many people will look to their peers and their peers’ children to gauge where their kids are in terms of development. However, it is better to look at family history for milestone development, including when kids will begin to talk.

When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

Resources

A lot of things will affect your child’s ability to begin to talk and learn new words. Having a supportive home, where the parents can spend time with the baby, is a large part of that. Supportive environments can easily allow for parents to be focused on the future development of their babies, so that the parents can try out new ways to keep their children’s interests high. When kids are interested, they will learn.

When it comes to helping your baby learn to talk, the best resource you have is yourself. Surrounding the baby with people talking to him directly will help him learn how to use words to communicate with other people. Exposure to words, giving your baby a chance to mimic your words and mouth’s movements—all of this helps your baby learn to talk. There are several other things you as a parent can do to help your child learn. Many parents will sing to their children, and ask questions, keeping their attention, and using their time together to bond with simple and silly songs. It can be scary to sing to your children at first, but some kids do love it a lot. My son was not adverse to it, but my daughter just loved it. It was not long before she would try to sing along, even though she wasn’t sure of the words. She would use her voice to do the different pitches while I sang.

Books are great to introduce to children early on. This can also help with language development, and books will become more of a resource when your baby is ready to learn how to read. Just as learning how to speak is a process that can span over the first several years of your baby’s life, learning to read requires several years, too. That is part of the reason there is a strong correlation between early readers and books; getting your children to love learning and seeing you love spending the time to teach them is a valuable gift.

In addition to reading, singing, and talking, it can also be fun to take a look at the technology available to helping you and your baby develop her skills. There are several applications and technologies that will help your child engage with new words and pictures. I have known several parents who will buy games for their phones specifically for their children, in case they are needed for particular situations, such as when the child has to wait. The good news about this is that there are a lot of programs and companies that design apps for helping kids learn and play. There are several free and inexpensive learning puzzles, games, pictures, and activities available for Apple and Android products.

Conclusion

When it comes to growing, particularly for talking, many babies will find and settle into their own paces. Learning is different for every child, and since language is much more complex than it seems to an adult, babies talk at a variety of different times. While most babies can begin using words as early as six months, it is important to keep in mind that time, practice, and growth will all factor into your baby’s ability to speak. Over the course of the first two to four years of their lives, they will learn how to use words and language to communicate. By the time they are three years old, they will be using sentences, longer and clearer, to talk with others.

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When Do Babies Sleep Through The Night?

Did your baby sleep through the night?

When Do Babies Sleep Through the Night?

Babies Sleeping Through the Night: An Introductory Overview.

Babies do not typically come out of the womb and begin sleeping through the night right away, as much as her mother might want her to. A baby is born and instantly she needs to have her needs met. When the baby was still inside its mother, she was able to get fed constantly, and it was easy for her to have her other needs taken care of.

Once a baby is born, a baby still needs to be fed, changed, and have her tummy settled. This is a large part of the reason why it is so hard to get a baby to sleep through the night once she is born; all of these procedures and requirements have to be met in order for a baby to get a good night’s sleep.

When a baby is born, for the first several weeks, mothers can easily feel like zombies, as they are constantly getting up and trying to take care of not only their baby, but their house, and if they are able, themselves. Many times after the birth of my children, I heard the mantra, “You need to sleep when the baby is sleeping.”

But it can be surprising to new mothers just how hard it is to get a shower without feeling like you should be sleeping instead, and it is hard not to notice how dirty or disorganized the home looks once you have had a baby. On top of that, there are groceries to buy, laundry to fold, and bills to pay. Because there are a lot of things on the parents’ “To-do” list, new mothers and fathers can easily be overwhelmed by the first weeks of parenthood.

During this time, it is important to recognize that it will end, and that it is a good thing that it will, because it means your baby is growing. It is also good to keep that in mind because you want to be able to realize that your sacrifice of your sleep now will help your child do better and feel better. It can be hard, especially if the mother suffers from post-partum, to get to a point where it is easy to give grace to others. It is also good to keep a mental checklist of what you do and try to repeat it.

For example, many babies will feed before they go to sleep. Once the baby is asleep, if you do not feel like going to sleep, try to clean for ten minutes and then try lying down. I had a lot more success with my second child because I knew I would have trouble sleeping, and I was able to anticipate my moods better.

Cleaning is a way of physically demonstrating that you are able to do some good while also helping to keep your emotions under control. This is helpful, because if you do not get enough sleep, it will be harder to control yourself. Once the baby has been fed, and you’ve done some cleaning and most likely some laundry organization, you will be a little more relaxed enough to at least lie down, if not fall asleep.

Another good item to have on your checklist is the issue of diapers. When a baby is newly changed, they will have an easier time of sleeping. This is true of all children. If you have a clean diaper, you will sleep longer. I have done my share of midnight diaper changes, and it is always harder to put the baby back to sleep if I have changed her. I would envy my friends who were capable of changing a diaper without waking their child in the process.

Finally, checking your baby for her creature comforts can help. I had a winter baby and a summer baby, and to this day, I know which one needs a blanket and which one will kick all of the blankets off the bed if I dare to put on too many.

Temperature, sound systems, and even air purifiers have all been suggestions I have heard to use in order to help my children get to sleep at night. Some parents will use essential oils, rubbing little droplets into the sheets, in order to help keep their baby asleep. Others will make sure that their child is positioned in a particular way, or certain music is playing.

These are all great ideas which you can use as you need to. Babies can change, but many people have found success in using bedtime routines. Even later on in their lives, some kids will not go to bed unless it is completely silent; others will need everything from a blanket to water to music to the nightlight.

Making the Transition

As babies are growing, you can easily look for the opportunities to lengthen out their sleeping patterns as they grow. Many newborns will need feedings pretty regularly, every three to four hours, or with even less time in between. Once you see that you can go an extra fifteen, thirty, or even sixty minutes in between feedings, you can start to work in the different sleep patterns.

Transitioning slowly helps you as a parent as much as it can help the baby learn to sleep peacefully. Tending to their needs, and seeing to the conditions in which they need to fall asleep, really makes you learn more about your child’s temperament and personality. It also gives their mind and body time to adjust; while your baby is sleeping, plenty of things are still growing and going on inside of him.

Sometimes, with the transition, it is good to have a way prepared for your baby to self-soothe. This can include popular measures such as pacifiers to help get your baby to lull himself back to sleep in the even he is startled awake. My children used the pacifier, but many of my friends have had kids that never seemed to want to take them. Some parents have discouraged this, because some babies will use their fingers or other body parts in order to soothe themselves back to sleep.

By the time your baby is six months old, you will also see that his physical body has changed and developed, and more development is coming as he grows. It is around this time that many parents will see the eight-hour mark on sleeping through the night, as the brain is getting bigger and needs more time to recover from the events of the day. In later months, it will be easier for the babies to stay asleep as they grow and begin using more of their energy reserves for crawling, walking, and playing.

With multiple children, it can happen that the second or third child will mimic more of the patterns of the older children. My son and daughter are prime examples of this; my soon took eighteen months to fall asleep for the whole night, whereas my daughter was staying asleep for the whole night in six months.

When it comes to transitioning, you should keep in mind that there are days when you are allowed to backslide, and there are days where you have no progress. Many people think that routine and repetition will be positive, so recognizing that it is possible for this not to happen will help keep your expectations realistic and achievable.

Resources and Recommendations

When it comes to resources, your baby’s doctor can be a source of invaluable information. Your pediatrician, especially if you have known your baby’s doctor for a time, can really give you insight into your child’s health. One of the best things about my baby’s doctor was just that she had a lot of experience, too, so she was able to identify a lot of things before I even finished complaining about them.

For example, one of the things that she suggested when I was having trouble breastfeeding was to use the nipple shield, and she said I could use it for as long as I needed it, even though most doctors would not recommend using it past six months. Part of the reason she suggested this to me was actually because my babies had trouble sleeping, and most of it had to do with the fact that I wasn’t producing enough milk for them to feed. It is hard to get a baby to go to sleep when he is hungry.

Another common experience that I have had as a parent and as a friend of parents is the question of sleeping with a full tummy. I had a friend whose son had severe acid reflux; because of this, it was hard to send him to bed if he had just eaten, but at the same time, most babies will sleep right after they have been fed. Since she was unsure of what to do, she and her husband would take their baby out in the car for a ride.

The comfortable bumping would help with the baby’s reflux, and keeping him in an upright position in the car seat helped prevent him from waking up due to gas or reflux. She told me that because of that, she was eventually able to get her son to sleep, but he was over a year old before it happened. They didn’t think it was that big of a deal, but one they told their doctor, they were able to make better adjustments to their son’s routine.

Another friend had a baby that had allergy problems in the spring and fall, but she thought it was just a simple cold. She was able to talk to her doctor and decide on a treatment plan for her son.

If you are not sure of your child’s sleeping pattern, it is good to ask your doctor about it. Sometimes it seems like every little thing can ruin a baby’s slumber, so it can be very helpful to have questions prepared and ready to ask when you visit the doctor’s office.

Conclusion

After having children, sleeping through the night becomes one of the most ardent wishes. Many parents will see their newborns able to sleep in blocks of six to eight hours as early as three months, but more will likely see this later on. Some children do not fully sleep through the night until they are one year old.

Whatever the length of time, there are several techniques a parent can use in order to encourage them to go to sleep. Taking care of the baby basics—making sure the baby has been fed a good amount, making sure the baby is wearing a clean diaper, and making sure the baby is in a comfortable position as well as a safe setting—is a great way to start a bedtime routine.

In the event that you are unsure of the baby’s progress in this area, feel free to consult your doctor for insights into your baby’s health. Since every child is different, it can be hard to expect what will happen down to the smallest details. However, remember that it is part of the learning and growing phase, and while it can be unpleasant and arduous, it is rewarding and a special time for you as a parent.

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When Do Babies Eyes Change Color?

Eyes come in a myriad of different colors, all ranging from blue to green, to brown and black, and every shade in between. It is with good reason that it has been said that the eyes are said to be the window to the soul. When it comes to babies, many parents look for the day when the color of the eyes is fully known. Many babies are commonly born with blue eyes, and their iris colors will change over the first year of their lives. The final changes will be around six to nine months of age, but there are some babies whose eyes do not change until well after the one-year mark. This is largely due to the many changes that take place at the time of birth, and the ones which will continue to change as the baby grows older. Genetics of the biological parents will play the most influence over the final color of your baby’s eyes.

When Do Babies Eyes Change Color

Your Baby’s Eyes: A Brief Overview of Anatomy

The colored part of the eye is known as the iris, and its color relies on three genetic markers. While science is developing fast, not all is known about all of these genes, so it is still impossible to predict your baby’s eyes until he or she is out of the womb. As the baby grows, the muscles strengthen, including the muscle which dilates the pupil, the black part in the middle of the eye. As the baby’s muscles develop, this muscle will pull the iris as the pupils dilate, and it will contract the iris when the eye is relaxed or in darker atmospheres. This is part of the reason that even as a child and an adult, people’s eyes can change shades; as the iris is contracted or expanded, the color can change depending on the emotional response. The white part of the eye, the sclera, is may also have a blueish tint when the baby is born, but this will go away as the baby gets more time out of the womb.

 Changing Colors in the Eye: An Introductory Overview

When a baby is born, the baby’s body is still going through a lot of changes as they exit the womb to a world where they are independent of their mother’s body. One of the more significant changes can be seen in the changing colors of the baby’s eyes. Babies are often born with bluer eyes when they are born, and this is largely due to the absence of melanin in their bodies. Melanin is a pigment that is present in many parts of the human body, and can determine colors in hair, skin, and the eyes. It is made in the baby’s body once the child is exposed to light. The melanin is the only pigment that is present in the eye, so everyone has a blue base, but the top color will change if there is more melanin produced as the baby ages, darkening the final color until it gets to the darkest shade of brown. Once the baby exits the womb and is able to develop the melanin on its own, the baby’s eyes will gradually change from a blueish color. Of course, should the genetics of the parents point to blue eyes, it is entirely possible that the child’s eyes will not change from blue, and in many cases, even then, the blue will either get lighter or darker.

Genetics are the biggest factor in determining what color your baby’s eyes are when they finish changing. It is by looking to the biological parents of the babies that the best guess will be established, until the baby’s eyes finally stop changing. Many people will cite that mutations for the eye color can change, and while that is true, there are no less than three genetic markers for eye color, and the change of the mutation happening to all of the genes is very, very slim. However, it is also important to keep in mind that because of the various genes that will code for eye color, there is a possibility the grandparents and previous generations will also have an influence on the final color of your baby’s eyes. Sometimes, specific genes can skip a generation, including eye color. If there is a grandparent who has blue eyes, and both parents have brown eyes, it is still possible that the baby will have blue eyes.

baby crawling on belly

Just like the rest of the baby’s body, the eye’s melanin production can take some time to work out and level off. This is part of the reason that it takes a longer time for the eyes to settle; while the color is generally set by the end of nine months, some parents have noted changes later than one year, but they are smaller changes by that time; it is extremely unlikely that the base color will change from blue to brown, and then go back to blue, for example.

Because of the differences in color and genetics, it may take a different amount of time for babies’ eyes to fully change. Sometimes it does not take long at all; My own children fall into this category, since both of them have blue eyes. However, while they both have blue eyes, my son’s blue eyes are darker blue, while my daughter’s eyes are lighter blue. They were both born with blue eyes, but my son’s became darker while my daughter’s faded into a lighter blue. I have a friend who has dark brown eyes; her baby was late, so when her daughter was born, she had dark blue eyes, but it didn’t take long before her daughter’s eyes were as dark as her mother’s eyes. However, it can take between nine months to a year before parents see a consistent shade of color shining back at them. This is more common with darker eyes, because of the pigmentation and its patterning; it is also more frequently seen in hazel eyes, where the pigmentation is more scattered and the gene marker which codes for the color is less understood as the others.

The possibility of changing colors after nine months is very rare, though not unheard of. Some children have been observed with changing eye color up until the age of six. Once more, in determining how long it will take for your child’s eyes to settle into their final color, genetics will play a significant role; however, each child is different, so it is best to keep track of it and to be on the lookout for signs of trouble.

What to Expect

When your baby is born, there will likely be a blueish tint to the eyes, if they are not completely blue already. Many children who end up with brown eyes have dark blue eyes at birth, or a blueish shade to them, though some babies can be born with dark eyes that look black. As the baby grows from an infant into a toddler, the color change will become more permanent. As your baby’s body develops and their systems are more regulated—think about how they eat, sleep, and poop on more regular schedules as they grow, compared to when they are first born—their eye color will have enough melanin produced in the eye that guessing the final color will be easier.

The baby has a significant growth spurt around six months of age, as its body gets ready to begin to move around more. This is around the time where the melanin build up has accumulated enough where you should see some difference in your baby’s eyes since he was born. As the melanin has developed and been stored, the baby’s eyes will have changed along with it. It only take a little for the melanin to change the blue to green, green to hazel, and hazel to brown or even black. The more melanin that the body is told to produce by the genes, the more it is likely it will take longer for your baby’s eyes to change, though that is not necessarily the case. More babies with dark eyes at birth have been reported with changes up to three years after birth, but once more, this is not necessarily the case.

The milestone marker for your baby’s eyes to settle into their final color sets the expectation that their eyes will finish changing around nine months. Whether blue-eyed or dark-eyed, it is likely that the baby’s eyes will begin to slow down and settle into their final color around this time, though it can easily take longer than that.

When to Consult Your Baby’s Doctor

Eyes are one of the easier ways to see if there is anything wrong with a baby. If the baby’s eyes look milky white at some point, or if the baby’s eyes develop into two different colors, it is important to consult your doctor. In general, if you are not sure your baby’s eyes are developing in a normal manner, then you can schedule an appointment with your child’s doctor, or you can request information on an eye doctor. Many children will go to the eye doctor when they are toddlers, so if you want to go early because you are not sure of a possible issue, try to find a doctor that you will be able to work with in the long term.

Any eye color in the irises can change later on in life, due to some diseases or other issues, including aging. That’s another good reason to make sure you have a good eye doctor available to your child, and why getting your baby a check-up can only help you in the long run. After your baby is born, one change that the sclera, the white part of the eye, may show is a yellowish tint; this can hint at jaundice. Most pediatricians will immediately recognize this as a build-up of bilirubin, and that has to be treated differently than an eye doctor would be able to treat it.

Another issue that comes up sometimes with baby’s eyes is with the camera flash. More cameras are able to pick up tumors on the back of the baby’s eyes. This is seen in pictures where the one eye is glowing white, and it consistently shows up as a bright spot on the child’s eye in pictures taken with a digital camera. This could be a sign of tumors or cancer, so it is important to get to a doctor that will be able to carefully examine your baby’s eyes for any inconsistencies.

When Do Babies Eyes Change Color?

 Conclusion

Your baby will have beautiful eyes, regardless of their color. While many parents long for a specific color or shade, your child will easily wear his or her eyes and make them fit his or her own style. From nine months to a year after they are born, our babies have a lot of changing that is going on inside of them and around them. During this time, we can eagerly wait for those changes and record them as they grow, and this includes the changing of the irises to their final colors. Some babies may require more time for their eyes to finish changing—with some changing after two or even three years—but it is not likely that the main colors of their eyes will change after the one-year mark. The best way to guess your baby’s final colors is to take a good look at the biological make-up of the grandparents from both parents, and then to compare them to the parents and others in the family tree. If you are not sure of the health or state of your baby’s eyes, the best thing to do is schedule an appointment with your baby’s regular doctor. Your baby’s pediatrician can easily check for other areas of concern that might be affecting the baby’s eyes, such as jaundice, and have your doctor recommend an eye doctor or specialist depending on what they find.

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When do babies crawl? When does it start? the complete guide

Baby crawling is the first effective means of mobilization of your baby. To crawl your baby first learns to stand on all six (on his hands and knees) so he can move forward and backward by pushing with his feet. As your baby develops he continues to develop his muscles in preparation to sit up and walk.

When do babies crawl, When does it start?

Most babies learn to crawl between the ages of 6-10 months, although some find other creative solutions such as belly crawl, mobilization of the bottom and feet while sitting or rolling around the room from side to side. Other babies skip the crawling stage altogether and immediately stand up and start to walk on two feet. The way your baby starts mobilization is insignificant, the main thing is that he has the ability to move and he is mobile in space which enables independent exploration of his environment.

How does crawling starts?

Most babies will start to crawl on six after they learn to sit steadily, without support, usually around the age of 7 months. At this stage your baby’s back muscles are strong enough to bear his weight when he gets on his knees and hands.

In the coming months your baby will learn to safely move from sitting to crawling on all six. Initially your baby will remain in this position or sometimes swing back and forth before actually starting to crawl.

Around the age of 9-10 months, your baby will understand that if he pushes his body with his knees he could move while he is on the all six position, and in fact set off crawling. As your baby becomes more aware to his position he could then move between crawling to a sitting position easier. Towards the age of 12 months your baby will crawl more efficiently and quickly. Some babies are even able to climb stairs while crawling.

Baby Milestones, What’s next?

In the next stage you will start seeing your baby pulling himself up, as he leans over the side of his bed, a chair or a small table, towards standing. Once your baby will feel stable and secure to stand alone without any support your baby will start exploring walking.

When do babies crawl And in what age

The Parents’ Role

The best way you as a parent can encourage your baby to crawl is by stimulation. With a colorful toy or a colorful object stimulate your baby to crawl by placing the toy a bit further away from your baby’s hands. Your baby should have to move forward to reach it (like we did to encourage perception and grasp).

As your baby’s crawling skills gets better with time you can then set up a kind of obstacle course all over your house to develop his ability to move forward, navigate and reach farther than ever. You can build obstacle courses from pillows, soft toys and blankets; just pay attention that the areas you make are safe and steady for your baby. It is necessary to block stairs and open surfaces inside your home in order to avoid any dangerous fall, remember when your baby crawls he can get all over the house.

More baby crawling tips and videos…

Each baby is unique and has his or hers own growth rate of its own unique development. It is important to understand what your baby can do at any age, but always remember that if they do not do so yet he will do so soon when the time is right for him. Remember, babies that were born premature (preterm) tend to develop later than babies born at term.

If your baby shows no interest or desire to move forward, roll or crawl, or if at the 12 months stage has not yet learned to move his hands and feet mimicking crawling movements consult your pediatrician.

How did your baby started to crawl? Did he or she pass this milestone quickly? Did they have any difficulties? We will be happy to hear from you… Comment below.

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What to expect the first year

Milestones are a great way to monitor your baby’s progression, incorporate ways to improve their age-appropriate skills into every day play, and feel prepared for each new stage as your baby reaches it. While it is easy to compare in a competitive manner with others about whose baby has reached a certain milestone earliest, it’s better to just enjoy each individual child’s pace, and not become anxious or possibly make others worried about how quickly each milestone is reached

What to expect the first year

It is truly amazing how many basic skills we master as an infant that allow us to go about our days in a functional manner as adults. These skills can be grouped into different categories, for the sake of tracking developmental progress:

  • Gross motor skills – these include more generalized physical movements
  • Fine motor skills – these include more specific physical movements, mostly with the hands
  • Social development – this includes interactions with other people
  • Language development – this includes not only verbal skills, but also thought processes such as problem-solving skills

Of course, each baby will develop at his or her own pace, to some degree. Sometimes a baby will be ahead in one area, right at the milestone age for another area, and behind in another area, all at once, and that’s perfectly normal. If a child is missing a milestone for an extended period of time, or if the doctor and parents are concerned about missed milestones, an evaluation can be done to see what interventions could benefit him or her.

Some of these interventions include participating in speech therapy, occupational therapy, and physical therapy – and often, there are many things the parents or caregivers can do at home first to help their baby continue to develop. The key isn’t necessarily an exact date that your baby should be able to do something by, but rather, a steady forward progression of skills.

That being said, parents and teachers are often the first to see the signs of a need for intervention, by intuition or by looking at the time frames around milestones. This is because they are the ones who are spending large amounts of time with the child, and may notice patterns that a short doctor’s visit would not reveal.

Of course, the more you interact with your baby in general, by talking with her, playing with toys with her, singing to her, making different facial expressions for her, reading with her, holding her, allowing her to experience new things, and providing enough down time at home where she’s not confined to just the crib or swing, will allow her to develop skills naturally.

One Month Milestones –

Around one month, your newborn baby will be lifting his head up from your chest when you hold him, or from the ground when participating in floor play (often called “tummy time”). He should be able to move his head to either side when on his belly. Of course, he should be attended at all times when on his stomach at this age, because he may get stuck at times; he will get tired, maybe only after a few seconds. Make sure tummy time is done on a smooth, flat, but comfortable surface – foam mats can be used to convert an area of harder flooring, or even over carpet.

Also around this time, your baby will start noticing things in close range (8-12 inches away). Unlike her ever changing and improving vision, she is born with her full hearing, and may startle at sounds like a door closing, another baby crying, etc. She probably recognizes immediate family members’ voices and is comforted by their conversations.

At this stage, he will probably notice toys that have faces. He will possibly notice things that contrast a lot, such as dark curtains against a light wall. He may like your black and white striped shirt, and there’s a reason – he still sees mostly black and white at this age.

What to expect the first year

Two Month Milestones –

One of the most prominent two month markers is the start of your baby making noises such as “cooing” or “gurgling.”She will likely make an “ahhh” sound first. At this point, she’s as likely talking to the bright lights on the ceiling as she is to her doll or you, but even so, you will get to enjoy her new antics during her calmer play times.

As for physical development, you will notice your baby has less jerky arm and leg movements, and should move all of his limbs about the same amount over a period of time. His fists will probably open and close, and grasp at your finger when you place it near his hand. He may touch his own face or clasp his own hands.

Three Month Milestones –

While your baby has probably been giving you “sleepy smiles” for a while now, she will start to smile in response to things you say or do, or other stimuli. She will follow objects as they move across her range of view, such as a bottle or toy. She may even take a swing at a dangling toy!

Around this time, your newborn will lift not only his head, but also start to raise his body up during tummy time. Between now and six months, your baby will learn how to roll over. Usually, he will first learn to roll from his stomach to his back, and later, from his back to his stomach.

While she previously may have ignored many noises in her sleepy, newborn state, she may now investigate sudden noises, especially loud ones. Your baby will also recognize objects she has seen before, such as toys or books.

Four Month Milestones –

Your baby will push her body up with her hands during tummy time, and push her legs against the ground if you hold her in a standing position. By this time, your baby should have really good head control. She will begin to reach for things around her and grasp them in a more coordinated fashion.

He will “talk back” to you when you talk to him, in the form of coos as well as imitations of your speech. Also, you may experience the joyous sound of your baby’s laughter at this time, so bring on the silly faces and noises.

This is around the age most babies are able to sleep through the night, much to your relief, exhausted parents!

Five Month Milestones –

If not earlier, around five months your baby will be able to roll over in both directions.  He will be conscious of his own hands and feet, and may even spend long periods of time studying them.

Your baby will be Interested in new sounds, and recognize her own name at this age. She may engage in blowing bubbles with her mouth, as she explores all she can do with her tongue and lips.

He will likely notice and enjoy different bright colors at this time, and express interest in especially colorful toys. Your baby will develop a sense of object permanence around this time (realizing that things still exist even when they can no longer see them – this is why your baby will be surprised time and again during a game of peek-a-boo!).

What to expect the first year

Six Month Milestones –

Your baby will be able to sit, although he may still need some support. During floor time, he may lunge like he is going to crawl. He may also scoot (some babies skip crawling and go straight to walking), or “army crawl,” that is, dragging himself along as low as possible to the ground, with just his arms.

Everything will go into the mouth at this age – your baby will be able to reach for an object and bring it to his mouth after retrieving it.

Often, doctors recommend solid foods are introduced at 6 months and even sooner, or whenever your baby is able to sit up. The introduction of solids will help in developing the skills your baby needs to feed himself, as well as get your baby used to different textures and tastes.

Seven Month Milestones –

Your baby will be able to sit without support. While sitting, she will probably display several new skills, such as being able to pull a toy toward herself using a sweeping motion of her arm. That would be more of a gross motor skill that you can expect her to master at this age; a fine motor skill she will develop at this age is the ability to pass a toy from one hand to another.

What to expect the first year

Eight Month Milestones –

Your baby may start to say dada and mama at this age – but don’t be surprised if you are both referred to by the same name, or both names, for a while!

If your baby is a crawler, he should be a professional at this point, getting around quite quickly. He might quite possibly start experimenting with pulling up on furniture, even if walking is still a ways away.

Another fun skill that will be developed at this age in the language development area is that your baby will begin to point at things, and attempt to communicate through some gestures. Some parents choose to teach their children a few simple signs based on American Sign Language at this stage, to help them communicate when they are hungry, all done, want to play, etc. This way, they can communicate before they can speak words, resulting in potentially less frustration.

Nine Month Milestones –

Nothing within reach is safe anymore! Your baby will be able to bang things together, throw things, and stand – though most likely only while supported. He may walk around using furniture to hold him up, which is called “cruising.”

Your baby’s hands are developing more fine motor skills around this age – she may eat finger foods off her high chair tray, and will use the “pincer grasp” to accomplish manipulating small pieces of food and objects – that is, her thumb and forefinger.

She may also wave good-bye, which she also associates with the meaning of the words bye-bye (that is, someone, or herself, leaving).

Socially, at this age babies often have stranger anxiety – anyone unfamiliar can be deeply unsettling. Your baby will outgrow any extreme reaction a little later on.

Ten Month Milestones –

Finally, when your baby calls out “Mama!”now, she might actually be referring to you specifically! She should also understand the word, “No,” at this point, to some degree – thankfully, she probably won’t be saying that for a little while longer.

Your baby will start to stack toys as he plays, so get out the blocks!

A game that you might not like this age for involves dropping objects repeatedly from a shopping cart, high chair, or over a baby gate, to see what happens, and what you will do. A ten month old finds reactions, and consequences, very interesting.

Eleven Month Milestones –

Often a skill mastered around this age is the ability to drink from a cup (although breast fed babies may not be introduced to this quite yet, as they don’t even need extra water until past twelve months). You can say bye-bye to bottles very soon!

Your baby should be able to stand all by herself – although possibly only briefly. While playing, you will observe your baby has the ability to puts toys inside containers, and may enjoy learning “in and out.” A favorite game at this age may be pat-a-cake.

Your baby will understand simple commands, such as, “Take this to Daddy,” or “Give me your cup,” or “Let’s go outside.” Of course, he may not always react the way you intend for him to.

Twelve Month Milestones –

You may find your baby imitating everything you do, from talking on the phone, to making dinner, to other activities. A play kitchen may be a great first birthday present!

His first steps may be taken around this time, although many babies wait a few more months – or he may have been walking for a couple of months already! The norm here is 9-14 months. Another skill he may master around this time will be stooping from a standing position, without falling all of the way down. This takes some balance!

A few more words may enter his vocabulary, as he imitates you and observes as you point out the names of things around you.

She may scribble on paper or books with a crayon, although coloring in the lines will not be a remote thought until much later.

Conclusion

Milestones are a great way to monitor your baby’s progression, incorporate ways to improve their age-appropriate skills into every day play, and feel prepared for each new stage as your baby reaches it. While it is easy to compare in a competitive manner with others about whose baby has reached a certain milestone earliest, it’s better to just enjoy each individual child’s pace, and not become anxious or possibly make others worried about how quickly each milestone is reached. As your baby’s motor skills, social skills, and language skills develop, you will likely find great joy and pride in their growth – don’t forget to update the baby calendar or the baby book!

Did your baby pass all these milestones? Did he or she had a hard time with one of them? We will be happy to hear from your experience.