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When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

Babies start talking around the six-month mark, but learning language is a more complex skill to acquire. As a result, even though a child may be able to say small words at six months, such as “mama,” or “dada,” or “baba,” she may not start talking clearly or talking in full sentences until she is two years or older. Some children do not speak well until they reach the age of four. Many factors, such as support, education, environment, and even genetics can influence how fast your child begins to talk clearly.

When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

From Babbling to Talking: An Introductory Overview

One of the bigger milestones that parents watch for is when babies start to talk. Parents eagerly await their child being able to talk clearly, use words well, and speak in full sentences. Who hasn’t tried to get their child to say “mama” or “dada” as a first word? Besides walking, talking is the most anticipated milestone among parents, especially new parents.

0-3 Months

Many experts will agree that it is never too early to begin teaching your child about language. Even while your baby is still in the womb, it is good to talk to him or her and let your baby become accustomed to your voice; this is not only a good bonding experience between the parents and the baby, but it is also a great way to get the baby to associate your voice with kindness and interest. This will help their learning ability and interest to grow later on.

Once the baby is born, talking to your baby continues this same idea. There are a couple of different ways to engage your child in working on his speech; it is good to try out the different methods a few times each, to see what your baby responds to and what she likes. The first method is simple; it is just talking to your baby. You can talk regularly, telling your baby what you are doing or what you are thinking. Many people call this way the more organic way of doing things, because it is just like having a one-sided conversation. You can also try stimulating your baby’s interest by using props. Getting your baby used to words by showing items or objects such as toys, or words and pictures on flash cards, means you are helping them to absorb the language and also allows them to observe you as you speak. Many babies will learn to imitate the sounds they hear by mimicking the way the mouth moves. I have a mom who is a speech-language pathologist, and she will often help kids learn new words by forming a child’s mouth, lips, and movement in the shape of the word. You can do similar things, by enunciating, and encouraging your child to do simple movements. At 0-3 months, many “b” sounds are easily encouraged as the bilabial sounds are among the easiest to develop. “M” sounds are also common because the baby commonly starts out with no teeth, making the “m” sound easier, even though the movement of the lips together can stump them for a bit.

During the 0-3 month period, some babies can learn several new words; however, these words will likely not be traditional or formal words. They will be more like syllables or gargles. Sounds like “ba” for bottle, for example, will indicate more of what he or she is saying. As your child grows, he will learn about how to say different sounds and make the connection between different names and objects. There is no need to worry about teaching him or feeling like a failure if he does not learn any specific words during this time. It is unlikely during this time that your baby will say words, but her sounds and her syllables will be able to give you hints as to what she wants or what she needs.

3-6 Months

By the 3-6 mark of your baby’s first year, your baby has begun to move his legs and arms more, and lift his head and enjoy tummy time much more. This is a time where they are seeing more of the world, and they are growing into their routines. It was during this time for my children that a routine became more obvious. Routines can be a good thing, because it can really help new parents find time to structure in learning activities; however, early on in the baby’s life, routines will need to be evaluated more often as the child grows. My son, for example, did not want to have his third nap of the day after he reached the six-month mark. For my daughter, she did not enjoy tummy time unless my husband was home to play with her. Eventually, as she began crawling, she would prefer me to sit with her while she moved around.

When it comes to routines with language, at this age it can be more easy to sit the baby down in a high chair and work on his language using toys and food, or showing him objects while he is sitting. This is where some friends of mine would use flash cards, to help the baby learn new words. Others I know would play short movies, usually with songs with motions, like “If You’re Happy and You Know It,” or “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.”

As your baby gets closer to the six-month mark, it is likely that he will begin trying to sound out words. Even if he or she cannot be clear about it, it is good to encourage your child in his or her efforts. During this time, it is possible for “mama” and “dada” to come up.

When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

6-12 Months

Between six and twelve months is when babies will start saying more words. This is the time when most experts agree that your baby will begin using words such as “mama” and “dada” and other easy words as well, usually no more than two syllables in length. During this time, infants will learn between five and ten new words, likely phrases or words they hear at home. My kids learned “kitty” very quickly, because we had two cats running around the house. Many parents will see the same things happening around their kids and their lives.

12-24 Months

A growing pattern of progress should continue during this time. Around the eighteenth month mark, your child will begin to form sentences with two or more words. Their vocabulary and knowledge of different words will continue to grow, though it may take some time to see significant progress, depending on the level of exposure. Many parents with more than one child will find that the subsequent children are able to pick up language use more quickly. This largely results from more exposure. I know my children play together, and because of this, there is a large amount of time that they spent interacting with the same toys and places. This is another reason why several parents who put their kids in daycare will often see progress differently from parents who keep their babies at home, particularly if their child is their only child. This difference among the way parents raise kids and the environments in which they live and work is also another reason why some kids respond differently to learning language.

As your baby grows into a toddler, their command of language will reflect that. They will likely be able to identify more objects and they will begin to repeat phrases. This is where the parents become more alert when it comes to their children hearing particular phrases or family secrets, fearful that it might be repeated or brought up in the wrong context. While this prompts more caution and discreteness from parents.

Things to Watch

Since every child grows and learns at his or her own pace, and learning something as complex as language requires time, practice, and incentive, it can be difficult to determine if there is an exact time to worry. If you suspect your child has a speech problem, whether it is learning new words, or remembering old words, you may want to consult with the child’s pediatrician. Having some documentation can also help, especially in the event that your baby’s doctor will ask for specific examples or concerns. This is part of the reason many speech and communication disorders are able to be formally diagnosed between two and three years of age now.

Genetics can also offer a clue when it comes time to worry. Many people will look to their peers and their peers’ children to gauge where their kids are in terms of development. However, it is better to look at family history for milestone development, including when kids will begin to talk.

When Do Babies Begin to Talk?

Resources

A lot of things will affect your child’s ability to begin to talk and learn new words. Having a supportive home, where the parents can spend time with the baby, is a large part of that. Supportive environments can easily allow for parents to be focused on the future development of their babies, so that the parents can try out new ways to keep their children’s interests high. When kids are interested, they will learn.

When it comes to helping your baby learn to talk, the best resource you have is yourself. Surrounding the baby with people talking to him directly will help him learn how to use words to communicate with other people. Exposure to words, giving your baby a chance to mimic your words and mouth’s movements—all of this helps your baby learn to talk. There are several other things you as a parent can do to help your child learn. Many parents will sing to their children, and ask questions, keeping their attention, and using their time together to bond with simple and silly songs. It can be scary to sing to your children at first, but some kids do love it a lot. My son was not adverse to it, but my daughter just loved it. It was not long before she would try to sing along, even though she wasn’t sure of the words. She would use her voice to do the different pitches while I sang.

Books are great to introduce to children early on. This can also help with language development, and books will become more of a resource when your baby is ready to learn how to read. Just as learning how to speak is a process that can span over the first several years of your baby’s life, learning to read requires several years, too. That is part of the reason there is a strong correlation between early readers and books; getting your children to love learning and seeing you love spending the time to teach them is a valuable gift.

In addition to reading, singing, and talking, it can also be fun to take a look at the technology available to helping you and your baby develop her skills. There are several applications and technologies that will help your child engage with new words and pictures. I have known several parents who will buy games for their phones specifically for their children, in case they are needed for particular situations, such as when the child has to wait. The good news about this is that there are a lot of programs and companies that design apps for helping kids learn and play. There are several free and inexpensive learning puzzles, games, pictures, and activities available for Apple and Android products.

Conclusion

When it comes to growing, particularly for talking, many babies will find and settle into their own paces. Learning is different for every child, and since language is much more complex than it seems to an adult, babies talk at a variety of different times. While most babies can begin using words as early as six months, it is important to keep in mind that time, practice, and growth will all factor into your baby’s ability to speak. Over the course of the first two to four years of their lives, they will learn how to use words and language to communicate. By the time they are three years old, they will be using sentences, longer and clearer, to talk with others.

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When Do Babies Sit Up? Complete Parent Guide [2019]

when do babies sit up and crawl

Sitting up is a milestone many parents look for, especially as a precursor to walking. Signs for sitting up usually occur around three months, making the average amount of time it takes for babies to sit up around four months. Up to this point, babies are getting more exercise with tummy time, strengthening their core muscles and their necks and backs; these are the critical areas babies need to develop in order to sit up. While time and practice is the best method for getting your baby ready to sit up, there are some techniques and resources which can help facilitate this milestone development.

When Do Babies Sit Up? Complete Parent Guide.

Babies Sitting Up: An Introductory Overview

Babies often sit up when they are close to four months old. On average, it takes babies between four and seven months to be able to sit up. There are several other milestones that a baby can reach during this time that are complementary to this skill, largely because it requires the same degree of physical development and autonomy.  Below are some of the specific signs, accompanied by more details.

Once you recognize the signs that your baby is ready to sit up, there are several techniques and tricks of the trade you can use to help him develop this skill and achieve this milestone. All of the techniques listed here are supportive and easily incorporated into routine for the baby, so it will be simple for you as a parent to encourage your child to grow in a healthy, happy manner.

Developing skills often take time. In addition to listing some of the techniques you can use, there are also some general tips for attitude and intention on your part as the parent. The hardest part of being a parent is mastering consistency. Many people often forget that parenting requires the parents to be learners as much as they are teachers. When it comes to working with sitting up, being a pillar of support will be a literal as well as metaphorical role. Much like their children, it is good for parents to remain focused but flexible.

With every milestone, there does come a point where questions and concerns plague the parents, especially if the milestone is not reached in the average amount of time, or even for a significant period after the milestone’s parameters. Because of this concern, there are some signs that you might want to ask a doctor about.

Finally, sitting up has several signs, but it is also a sign in itself; your baby is growing and getting ready to take on the world on her own terms. It is a warm, fun time in your baby’s life, and just like things that are fun, there are some times when things can seem too hard, too stressful, and too worrisome. But keep in mind that all babies, as much as we might hate it some days and long for it on others, were meant to grow up and grow into adults. We must be vigilant and supportive without being smothering; we must be brave and face our fear as our child begins to face his world.

Sitting up is a milestone many parents look for, especially as a precursor to walking. Signs for sitting up usually occur around three months, making the average amount of time it takes for babies to sit up around four months. Up to this point, babies are getting more exercise with tummy time, strengthening their core muscles and their necks and backs; these are the critical areas babies need to develop in order to sit up. While time and practice is the best method for getting your baby ready to sit up, there are some techniques and resources which can help facilitate this milestone development.

When Do Babies Sit Up? Complete Parent Guide.

Signs Your Baby is Ready to Begin Sitting Up

At the four-month mark, as mentioned in previous articles, there are other similar skills which are being developed. At this point, your baby is likely able to roll from his tummy to his back, or he is working towards it. This is one of the signs that your baby is ready to try sitting. To be fully prepared for this, there are physical requirements, and supplementary support from parents.

If you think about what it takes to be able to sit up, particularly sitting up straight, it might be easy or tempting to think it is simple just because it is easy. For a baby to sit up, her muscles in her back and neck will need to be strong enough to hold up her head and keep her balance. Balance also comes into play concerning her hips. Keeping balance with the hipbones is what allows people to sit up continuously. Finally, your baby’s muscles will also have to work in order for her to be able to move her body into position.

Many parents will help their babies learn to sit up by placing them on their laps. Many times, my kids have begun learning to sit as they sat in my lap and leaned against my torso and supported their legs against mine. This is how many parents will go about starting the process of learning to sit up for their children. It is a nice way; I know this from experience as well as doctor recommendations. If you place your baby in a sitting position on the floor by herself, she will likely slump over or fall to her tummy in a matter of seconds.

Another common sign that your baby is ready to sit up on his own is moving his feet, or reaching for objects out of his reach. If your baby shows a growing determination and curiosity for the world around him, it is likely that he will begin to experiment with sitting up, moving, and rolling over soon.

Developing Skills

Getting a baby used to the sitting position is part of practicing. This is part of the reason that I would sit my kids on my lap first; it is a good way to get started, because it is good in getting them used to the movements as well as getting them used to the positions. This helps them ease into it, and you can begin teaching them how to sit up by going backwards, starting from the sitting position, and going back down to their tummy or their back. This can also help your baby with his skills in rolling over; extra benefits are always nice for parents, too. I have noticed with my new parent friends especially that there is a bit more hesitation when you get started, so having the baby sit in your lap might be just as supportive and comforting to you as it is to your child.

As you continue to engage with your baby, during your time practicing, you will begin to see further signs your baby is ready to go from sitting in your lap to sitting up on his or her own. It is likely that if you practice often from the four-month mark, especially going over the motions required to move from a laying down position to a sit-up position, your baby will do it on his own when he wants to.

With this new amount of freedom your baby has, there are always some things in which general rules will help. To prevent unpleasant accidents, make sure your child has plenty of open space to explore. Keeping your baby on a blanket or sheet while you practice can also help. This is something that might especially come in handy if you have hard floors in your home. For my kids, I had a play mat that was just large enough for me to lay them on and have some space for me to sit next to them. I would teach them to sit up by preparing them on the mat, and at first, they would sit up on that mat. Of course, once they got more curious, they would crawl and move off the mat.

Things to Watch

In addition to watching the surroundings of your baby as he learns to sit up, there are other areas in which parents might find themselves concerned. One concern in particular is that your baby does not seem interested in sitting up, or they are delayed in sitting up past the first seven months. For this, it is best to talk to your doctor. Many parents worry that their baby is not eating enough, not sleeping enough, not moving around enough; this is where a family doctor will be able to point you in the right direction for a specialist. I had a friend who had complications during birth, and as a result, even though her son was healthy, he had about a month delay on sitting up and standing, and several other milestones as well. He worked with a physical therapist for a while, and gradually it became much easier for him to move around. Today, he is just as fast and sharp as his peers.

Because sitting up is related to other milestones, and is often seen as a precursor to specific milestones such as crawling, standing, and walking, it is a good idea to make sure that you, as a parent, have a support system. Today, many people seem to know a lot of people, but it is hard to find people who you trust. Trusting people with your kids is especially challenging for many. To help this, once your baby begins to move and sit up, make sure you have someone who can help you with the day to day duties of running a household or can help you watch your child when you are tired. It is very, very taxing to be vigilant all the time, and as your baby begins to sit up and move around, it is good to establish trust so others can help relieve you when you need it. For me, I had some family members nearby who would come when they could, and I have a friend as my permanent babysitter who comes when I need help or I go to work. If you are not able to afford a sitter or daycare, try to find a friend who can swap off babysitting duties with you. I have a couple of friends who do that, and they all agree it is a good way for their kids to socialize while giving one mom a break.

Sitting up is a milestone many parents look for, especially as a precursor to walking. Signs for sitting up usually occur around three months, making the average amount of time it takes for babies to sit up around four months. Up to this point, babies are getting more exercise with tummy time, strengthening their core muscles and their necks and backs; these are the critical areas babies need to develop in order to sit up. While time and practice is the best method for getting your baby ready to sit up, there are some techniques and resources which can help facilitate this milestone development.

When Do Babies Sit Up? Complete Parent Guide.

Resources to Help

Sitting up can be one of the milestones that is taken for granted. After all, many babies seem to sit up on their own as they sit down in their high chairs, or they sit in their baby swings or baby seats. How hard could it be to go from that to sitting up on their own? Since it can be more complicated than meets the eyes, there are some products that can help.

Bumbo seats have mixed reviews among parents and professionals, but they are there to get your child into a safe position where his back is straight. The seat does not allow him to sit up unassisted, but if you are unable to sit with your child, this could be a good substitute to get him used to how it feels to sit up.

With the Bumbo seats, there are several variations of the product; some have trays, which make it easy to sit your baby down and allow him to eat sitting up. There are other seats, too, which will buckle your child in and allow them to sit up straight.

While it is not a physical resource, there are some exercises that you can go through with your child. These movements can help your baby go from lying on her back to sitting up all on her own with enough time, patience, and practice.

It is important to remember that sitting up is a common milestone for babies to achieve around four to seven months. However, many babies can take their time in achieving it, and there is little cause for concern if he or she does not want to pursue it as much as another baby might. New parents in particular seemed stressed if their child does not meet a milestone or even exceed it; parents with two or more kids are more relaxed and confident in situations like this.

Conclusion

Sitting up is a milestone many parents look for as a sign their baby is growing and healthy. While this is the case, it can take time for your child to decide he or she wants to pursue this milestone, and it may take time for your baby’s muscles to develop and strengthen. Many factors, such as genetics, health, and stimulation all play a critical role in this stage of baby development. Keeping this in mind, as you study your baby’s growth, you should be able to hold him to realistic and flexible expectations.

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When Do Babies Eyes Change Color?

Eyes come in a myriad of different colors, all ranging from blue to green, to brown and black, and every shade in between. It is with good reason that it has been said that the eyes are said to be the window to the soul. When it comes to babies, many parents look for the day when the color of the eyes is fully known. Many babies are commonly born with blue eyes, and their iris colors will change over the first year of their lives. The final changes will be around six to nine months of age, but there are some babies whose eyes do not change until well after the one-year mark. This is largely due to the many changes that take place at the time of birth, and the ones which will continue to change as the baby grows older. Genetics of the biological parents will play the most influence over the final color of your baby’s eyes.

When Do Babies Eyes Change Color

Your Baby’s Eyes: A Brief Overview of Anatomy

The colored part of the eye is known as the iris, and its color relies on three genetic markers. While science is developing fast, not all is known about all of these genes, so it is still impossible to predict your baby’s eyes until he or she is out of the womb. As the baby grows, the muscles strengthen, including the muscle which dilates the pupil, the black part in the middle of the eye. As the baby’s muscles develop, this muscle will pull the iris as the pupils dilate, and it will contract the iris when the eye is relaxed or in darker atmospheres. This is part of the reason that even as a child and an adult, people’s eyes can change shades; as the iris is contracted or expanded, the color can change depending on the emotional response. The white part of the eye, the sclera, is may also have a blueish tint when the baby is born, but this will go away as the baby gets more time out of the womb.

 Changing Colors in the Eye: An Introductory Overview

When a baby is born, the baby’s body is still going through a lot of changes as they exit the womb to a world where they are independent of their mother’s body. One of the more significant changes can be seen in the changing colors of the baby’s eyes. Babies are often born with bluer eyes when they are born, and this is largely due to the absence of melanin in their bodies. Melanin is a pigment that is present in many parts of the human body, and can determine colors in hair, skin, and the eyes. It is made in the baby’s body once the child is exposed to light. The melanin is the only pigment that is present in the eye, so everyone has a blue base, but the top color will change if there is more melanin produced as the baby ages, darkening the final color until it gets to the darkest shade of brown. Once the baby exits the womb and is able to develop the melanin on its own, the baby’s eyes will gradually change from a blueish color. Of course, should the genetics of the parents point to blue eyes, it is entirely possible that the child’s eyes will not change from blue, and in many cases, even then, the blue will either get lighter or darker.

Genetics are the biggest factor in determining what color your baby’s eyes are when they finish changing. It is by looking to the biological parents of the babies that the best guess will be established, until the baby’s eyes finally stop changing. Many people will cite that mutations for the eye color can change, and while that is true, there are no less than three genetic markers for eye color, and the change of the mutation happening to all of the genes is very, very slim. However, it is also important to keep in mind that because of the various genes that will code for eye color, there is a possibility the grandparents and previous generations will also have an influence on the final color of your baby’s eyes. Sometimes, specific genes can skip a generation, including eye color. If there is a grandparent who has blue eyes, and both parents have brown eyes, it is still possible that the baby will have blue eyes.

baby crawling on belly

Just like the rest of the baby’s body, the eye’s melanin production can take some time to work out and level off. This is part of the reason that it takes a longer time for the eyes to settle; while the color is generally set by the end of nine months, some parents have noted changes later than one year, but they are smaller changes by that time; it is extremely unlikely that the base color will change from blue to brown, and then go back to blue, for example.

Because of the differences in color and genetics, it may take a different amount of time for babies’ eyes to fully change. Sometimes it does not take long at all; My own children fall into this category, since both of them have blue eyes. However, while they both have blue eyes, my son’s blue eyes are darker blue, while my daughter’s eyes are lighter blue. They were both born with blue eyes, but my son’s became darker while my daughter’s faded into a lighter blue. I have a friend who has dark brown eyes; her baby was late, so when her daughter was born, she had dark blue eyes, but it didn’t take long before her daughter’s eyes were as dark as her mother’s eyes. However, it can take between nine months to a year before parents see a consistent shade of color shining back at them. This is more common with darker eyes, because of the pigmentation and its patterning; it is also more frequently seen in hazel eyes, where the pigmentation is more scattered and the gene marker which codes for the color is less understood as the others.

The possibility of changing colors after nine months is very rare, though not unheard of. Some children have been observed with changing eye color up until the age of six. Once more, in determining how long it will take for your child’s eyes to settle into their final color, genetics will play a significant role; however, each child is different, so it is best to keep track of it and to be on the lookout for signs of trouble.

What to Expect

When your baby is born, there will likely be a blueish tint to the eyes, if they are not completely blue already. Many children who end up with brown eyes have dark blue eyes at birth, or a blueish shade to them, though some babies can be born with dark eyes that look black. As the baby grows from an infant into a toddler, the color change will become more permanent. As your baby’s body develops and their systems are more regulated—think about how they eat, sleep, and poop on more regular schedules as they grow, compared to when they are first born—their eye color will have enough melanin produced in the eye that guessing the final color will be easier.

The baby has a significant growth spurt around six months of age, as its body gets ready to begin to move around more. This is around the time where the melanin build up has accumulated enough where you should see some difference in your baby’s eyes since he was born. As the melanin has developed and been stored, the baby’s eyes will have changed along with it. It only take a little for the melanin to change the blue to green, green to hazel, and hazel to brown or even black. The more melanin that the body is told to produce by the genes, the more it is likely it will take longer for your baby’s eyes to change, though that is not necessarily the case. More babies with dark eyes at birth have been reported with changes up to three years after birth, but once more, this is not necessarily the case.

The milestone marker for your baby’s eyes to settle into their final color sets the expectation that their eyes will finish changing around nine months. Whether blue-eyed or dark-eyed, it is likely that the baby’s eyes will begin to slow down and settle into their final color around this time, though it can easily take longer than that.

When to Consult Your Baby’s Doctor

Eyes are one of the easier ways to see if there is anything wrong with a baby. If the baby’s eyes look milky white at some point, or if the baby’s eyes develop into two different colors, it is important to consult your doctor. In general, if you are not sure your baby’s eyes are developing in a normal manner, then you can schedule an appointment with your child’s doctor, or you can request information on an eye doctor. Many children will go to the eye doctor when they are toddlers, so if you want to go early because you are not sure of a possible issue, try to find a doctor that you will be able to work with in the long term.

Any eye color in the irises can change later on in life, due to some diseases or other issues, including aging. That’s another good reason to make sure you have a good eye doctor available to your child, and why getting your baby a check-up can only help you in the long run. After your baby is born, one change that the sclera, the white part of the eye, may show is a yellowish tint; this can hint at jaundice. Most pediatricians will immediately recognize this as a build-up of bilirubin, and that has to be treated differently than an eye doctor would be able to treat it.

Another issue that comes up sometimes with baby’s eyes is with the camera flash. More cameras are able to pick up tumors on the back of the baby’s eyes. This is seen in pictures where the one eye is glowing white, and it consistently shows up as a bright spot on the child’s eye in pictures taken with a digital camera. This could be a sign of tumors or cancer, so it is important to get to a doctor that will be able to carefully examine your baby’s eyes for any inconsistencies.

When Do Babies Eyes Change Color?

 Conclusion

Your baby will have beautiful eyes, regardless of their color. While many parents long for a specific color or shade, your child will easily wear his or her eyes and make them fit his or her own style. From nine months to a year after they are born, our babies have a lot of changing that is going on inside of them and around them. During this time, we can eagerly wait for those changes and record them as they grow, and this includes the changing of the irises to their final colors. Some babies may require more time for their eyes to finish changing—with some changing after two or even three years—but it is not likely that the main colors of their eyes will change after the one-year mark. The best way to guess your baby’s final colors is to take a good look at the biological make-up of the grandparents from both parents, and then to compare them to the parents and others in the family tree. If you are not sure of the health or state of your baby’s eyes, the best thing to do is schedule an appointment with your baby’s regular doctor. Your baby’s pediatrician can easily check for other areas of concern that might be affecting the baby’s eyes, such as jaundice, and have your doctor recommend an eye doctor or specialist depending on what they find.

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The human pacifier: What should you do when your baby does not stop sucking?

What to do when your baby does not stop sucking? Here’s what:

Spot signs of hunger

Our baby body does not lie and if he or she shows signs of hunger – he or she are really hungry. If you see previous signs of hunger, our baby may have experienced growth sprouts and or development milestones and he is in fact more hungry than usual. Increased hunger signs may be: Putting his hands in his mouth with intensively clenched fists, continuous drooling, and general discomfort and quenching. It is important that in situation like these, and when breastfeeding, you as a mom will also try to identify your baby’s satiety signs during breastfeeding, any breastfeeding. Signs of satiety may be: a loose/flabby body, loose/flabby fingers and more. If you do not see any signs of satiety during breastfeeding, keep reading.

heres what to do when your baby does not stop sucking

The amount of milk

If you spot signs of hunger in your baby and the need for continuing to breastfeed for a long time and periods, and there are no signs that your baby is satiety during breastfeeding, maybe your baby is not getting a sufficient amount of milk at each feeding. You should check the effectiveness of breastfeeding and the amount of milk. If breastfeeding is not effective, due to reasons like ANKYLOGLOSSIA – Tongue-Tie and Lip-Tie related issues our baby will be sated for only short periods of time and often ask to nurse again and again.

Spot signs of fatigue

If you see that your baby is unable to fall asleep on his own and needs the help of breastfeeding or sucking the nipple and you can recognize signs of fullness during breastfeeding, it is possible that your baby has reached a critical stage of fatigue where he or she will need help to fall asleep, this help is brought by breastfeeding.

It is very important for you as a mom to recognize the signs of fatigue in your baby early and try to put him to sleep in a peaceful and relaxed atmosphere with gentle stroking, rocking and soothing him to sleep. It is possible and well encouraged to do this from the age of one week or two weeks, thus allowing your newborn baby to learn the process of falling asleep relaxed and comfortable from his first days and on words.

Early signs of fatigue may be: moving his or her head from side to side and the inability to focus their view. If your baby reaches a critical stage of fatigue and you can spot it by his crying, making high sounds, hyperactivity, tears and laughter combined and more, it is important for you to understand that at this stage your baby needs all the possible help to fall asleep and breast milk can really help calm him down at this time. When you spot critical fatigue in your baby this is NOT the time for learning or teaching him.

The need to poop:

Many times our baby will want to breastfeed to help him poop. Our ring muscle systems in our body are interrelated, so our tiny baby will try to activate his muscles of the mouth and lips so his muscle system will help the poop go down and out of his system. This situation will not look like signs of hunger in our baby but as signs that he or she needs to poop. These signs can be: Sucking movements with the lips, licking his lips, rapid movements with his pelvis, and even stretching his legs back and forth.

If you recognize these signs in your baby, you can hold your baby in the kneeling posture on your hands: When his back is to your chest and his legs are bent toward the abdomen.

Teaching your baby to suck a pacifier

First thing first, not every baby’s jaw structure is suitable for a pacifier, so it’s important to test and try a variety of dummies and don’t quit after the first or second. Some babies who initially fail to take a pacifier because their jaw structure is not suitable for it at the present and they will start after they will grow up a bit and their jawline changes. It is possible that your baby’s jaw structure would work out just at the age when the pacifier is no longer relevant.

It is very important at the beginning to let your baby play with the pacifier and get used to it at times when he or she are calm and relaxed and not hungry or tired. When you see that your baby has been playing and getting familiar with the pacifier in a relaxed way, then you can offer it to him in situations in which you recognize early signs of fatigue. Give him the pacifier in a relaxed and quiet atmosphere and as part of his falling asleep routine.

When you give your baby a pacifier for the first time, try to emulate sounds of sucking and the action needed. Babies and children learn from the simulation, they will try to imitate you and understand more easily the action that is needed.

Conclusion

You are not a human pacifier, and if this is the case you need to stop now and change this behavior. First recognize when your baby is hungry – if this is the case breastfeed, if this is not the case try different methods to let your baby relax and get some peace and tranquility for your baby and for you.

Do you have a special technic to get your baby to relax instead of breastfeeding? Did you encounter breastfeeding dependents? We will love to know.

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